First taste of Covehithe

Spent a few hours at Covehithe in the end. I got there after the top of the tide so could have walked for miles either way. It’s something I’ll have to remember, always check the tide tables. The water comes right up to the cliff edge each tide so it would be easy to get cut off. And cut off is what has happened to the land here! The rate of erosion is quite dramatic. There were large chunks of wheat field on the beach and wheat growing right up to the cliff edge, evidence of recent land slips. Talking to a fisherman I learned that not so long ago you could drive right down to the beach past

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Return to Shingle Street

Yesterday I went back to Shingle Street for the first time in at least 15 years. It is so familiar yet strangely changed. The nature of single banks is it reflect the recent history of total action. The tide was high so I didn’t get any real idea off how the foreshore might be configured at present, but there was a spiral hook and island that wasn’t there last time I visited and the established beach seemed wider and had a greater covering of plants than I remember.

White line of whelk shells on Shingle Street

The weather was grey and damp (to downright wet) and the north-west wind was cold and raw, so I may not have fallen

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Setting out again

Sadly I have not been able to keep up as well as I had hoped with this Tidelines blog due mostly to all the preparations for my recent Open Studios event. It’s also sad that I’ve not even been able to get out for as many beach walks as I would have liked, but I have been successful in incorporating many Tidelines ideas and influences into my work. Nearly all of the pieces I showed at the Five Artists at the Chapel in the Garden exhibition were Tidelines-related, and even some of my #Collage365 work is influenced by this project.

Now that show is out of the way I’m hoping I can return to the Tidelines process in

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What will be my new beaches and why?

I have been thinking a lot about the reasons I have chosen my target beaches from the past and pondering what the “rules” should be for choosing my new sections of coastline. From the outset all those years ago I think a key theme was to discover what makes those places special for me and what was it that caught me about them from the start.

Clearly some places are embedded in my history: the section from Leigh to Southend was my childhood-to-teens local coastline. My Nanna lived with my Uncle Ted in his house overlooking the estuary at Leigh and my Auntie Lil lived in Southend. It was an easy bus or train ride to either from my childhood

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Sebald and Shingle Street

I am reading Sebald’s Rings of Saturn at the moment and I went to an evening celebrating Sebald at Bridport Arts Centre last Sunday. I had to go because I had read in Roger Deakin’s Notes from Walnut Tree Farm, “Read Sebald and you can never look at the landscape in the same way again.” I ordered the book and within hours had an email from a friend telling me of the Sebald evening. No brainer really!

It was an interesting evening featuring a wonderfully frank and irreverent lecture on Max Sebald’s life and work from Uwe Schüte and a screening of Grant Gee’s Patience – After Sebald introduced by Gareth Evans.

The evening was started off with a reading

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